Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 11 total)
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  • #14981 Reply

    Christie Morehouse
    Participant

    I like to practice outdoors when the Michigan weather is beautiful (like today). But my fiddle sounds thin & snarky! Any thoughts on this? I think it is the humidity, but people play outside all the time. Maybe let the fiddle acclimate for a few minutes first?

    #14989 Reply

    violinist062391
    Participant

    I like playing outside too you can really hear yourself

    #15599 Reply

    Geni758
    Participant

    I think the reason your violin sounds thin & snarky outside is because there’s nothing for the sound waves to bounce off of, they just float off into space. Indoors, the sound waves bounce off the walls or get absorbed by furniture, carpet, etc., all of which affect your perception of the sound. I took my violin with me to my cousin’s house at Easter and I was surprised how loud it sounded. Of course it was all hard surfaces and no carpeting or upholstered furniture where I was, so it really sounded loud even though the room was big. You just need to get used to the fact that your violin’s sound will differ depending on what environment it is played in.

    #15601 Reply

    Daniel Ware
    Participant

    I’ve also wondered about playing/practicing outside, but I know the bow and violin can be susceptible to weather. Are there certain conditions (ex. temperature ranges, humidity ranges) where it is safe to play or practice outside or a time frame you should limit yourself to practicing?

    #15617 Reply

    Ladbrooke Bomeke
    Participant

    The rules of the harp is that if a harpist plays at a wedding that’s outside, she (or he) typically shows up about an hour early not to just set up but so the instrument adjust to the weather and won’t go out of tune while the bridal party is marching. The harp has to be in shade because you risk more damage with it being in the sun. Harpists put that in the contract with writing it out to the bride, that’s how important it is.

    So I would try playing the violin in the shade too. Surely you don’t have to wait an hour for the violin to adjust to the weather but it might be best to give it some time and playing at the temperature of 60’s and 70’s is best and if course the less humidity the better. Those are very strong rules for the harp when it comes to taking it outside and since the harp and violin are both made of wood I’m sure the rules apply and some way.

    #15635 Reply

    Shiroi98
    Participant

    @Ladbrooke, that is interesting! Never thought of that. I would assume that you have to play “louder” when playing outside too?

    #15636 Reply

    Mariko
    Participant

    I didn’t know about the harp either. I would love to play outside, but I’m afraid it will damage my violin. Usually it’s pretty hot hear and high humidity. So I prefer to play inside. 🙂

    #15647 Reply

    Ladbrooke Bomeke
    Participant

    Nah you really don’t have to forcefully play louder. If it’s a decent harp the sound will carry well on its own.

    #15661 Reply

    Christie Morehouse
    Participant

    Good thoughts, thanks. I am taking it to a party tomorrow, in case there is some jammin’ going on. I will leave the case open

    #15663 Reply

    Kenneth Branton
    Participant

    The problem I have with playing outside is the high humidity in south Louisiana. It seems it makes my bow strings stretch and after playing several minutes the bow becomes too loose.

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