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  • #16703

    krissy
    Participant
    • Contribution Score 9

    Hey all. I recently watched a video Michael made about re-selling one of his students old violins and he made a comment that I have a question about. He said that some violins sound better with age – and here is my question. I have an old violin that belonged to my grandfather. He was born in 1919 – I don’t know how old he was when he got his violin – but I’m guessing the violin is at least 90 years old. It is in need of repair – is cracked at the back and side seems, needs a new bridge and strings. It has pegs, chin rest, and tailpiece. It has the sound peg inside but it is not attached. There is no name on it to figure out what kind of violin it is. My question is would it be worth it to fix it to play? And how would I find someone who can fix it properly?? There is a small music shop nearby and the owner says he could fix it but I am a little skeptical. Any thoughts and or advice??? I am pretty new to the violin world but have long admired the sound of the instrument and think it would be really cool to play the same violin my grandfather played!!

    #16711

    Prog1
    Participant
    • Contribution Score 28

    Have another professional look at it, but yes, it’s hard to duplicate the nice sounds of age.

    #16751

    Prog1
    Participant
    • Contribution Score 28

    especially as it has sentimental value, too.

    #16762

    HDuaneaz
    Participant
    • Contribution Score 99

    In the 1960s, when I played as a child, I used a violin that I shared with my 2 sisters that never practiced. I thought it was theirs’. The sound post kept falling. My orchestra teacher working on musical instruments a kept resetting it for me at no cost. He did so much for me. I really appreciated him It was also very difficult to tune because the pegs slipped. I struggle with this violin for 5 years. Later, I found out the my grandfather bought it for my mother at a pawn shop in the early 1940s. My grandfather taught my mother violin.

    For several years, until I had an 11 year old daughter who was interested in the violin, I never played except on very rare occasions. My daughter became interested in the violin because she saw the old violin that I had as a child. The violin was practically in pieces by then. I found out why the sound post kept falling. A crack had developed on the e-string side about an inch from the fingerboard.

    Just today, my wife asked me if I was ever going to throw it away. I told her that I will never throw it away.

    When my daughter started playing, I took my old violin to a violin shop said he could restore it, but it would never be playable unless he replaced everything but the back and fingerboard.

    My wife will have to wait til my heart stops beating to get rid of it, and I doubt very seriously that my daughter would let her.

    #16775

    krissy
    Participant
    • Contribution Score 9

    Its so neat to hear the stories behind the violins!!

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