Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 23 total)
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  • #9913 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    Enjoy this impromptu video I made after teaching a lesson two years ago where I started to freely improvise and played a little tune called Nuages meaning Clouds.

    #9916 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    Enjoy another Django favorite, “HoneySuckle Rose”, performed by Gypsy Jazz Quintet at a wedding reception. I love the interaction that occurs in this group, especially between myself on fiddle and the virtuosic clarinet wizard Nick Driscoll.

    #9919 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    Here’s the a link to Nuages (my apologies for any confusion.)

    #9920 Reply

    Fun music! I wish I was better at improvising!

    #9921 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    If you liked those, here’s a little Balkan flavored soirée into some real Gypsy Schmaltz… Enjoy O Che’ Czorna (correct my spelling if it’s incorrect, if you please, but I’ll stand by my choice of notes on this one.:)

    #9923 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    One more Gypsy Jazz Quintet clip… This one features a lovely and rousing FIDDLE solo to “Sweet Georgia Brown”. I hope you like it! I haven’t shared these with anyone since I put them online a few years back, my solo a couple minutes in is completely improvised. Very bluegrass fiddle inspired. I’ll share my patented 7 secrets to left hand improvisation and 7 secrets to Bowing improvement with the first person to identify one of a few different musical quotes to different melodies and tunes within my solo. Cheers! Message me or reply below and I’ll be happy to share what took 20 years to acquire and nearly ten to perfect.

    #9924 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    Sweet Georgia Brown
    By Gypsy Jazz Quintet – as filmed by Lily Gregory

    #9927 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    Thanks Man! You can’t lose by thinking outside the box a little. Firstly, get the Charlie Parker Omnibook in C and start playing through KoKo. I’ve got many books on scales that are unorthodox, as well as the Carl Flesch and similar scale systems which I was brought up playing as I was trained as a purely classical violinist. The Parker book is very difficult so I played through it very slowly and numbered every note by its interval in relation to the Chord structure of each measure/sub-measure (sometimes there’s more than one chord per measure. The trick for learning how to improvise is to play off of your strengths, while developing gradually with a long term goal to hash out the hard stuff by separating the theory from the playing. All the theory needed is accessible within the established classical systems… It’s simply a matter of finding transcriptions of violinists and other players like Miles Davis, Louie Anderson, even cats Like vocalist Frank Sinatra. If it’s not transcribed on paper, try to do it, or find sheet music and compare the notes. Or learn to play by ear. Bluegrass and Celtic fiddling are a gateway to jazz improvisation, but after a while it all has seemed to mesh together into a universally accessible musical language for me. I’ve been working on improving every day and it’s taking me over 17 years of dedication just to say as much as I’ve said. The playing speaks for itself, and it’s not always perfect, but nothing is. I’m a work in progress, and by seeing one’s self as such, it’s not as hard to accept that each day is an opportunity to improve… Even if it’s one aspect of one element of one single thing, over time the progress is worth the journey. Cheers!

    #9928 Reply

    Nicholas Guess
    Participant

    I LOVE THIS! It’s so fun and jazzy! You guys sound great together! It must be fun to play in a band like that!

    #9930 Reply

    Mark Woodyatt
    Participant

    Thank you Nichola! Indeed, it certainly is a whole load of fun playing timeless classics with great musicians like these! Glad you like it! The bandleader/guitarist/arranger John Curtin put together this band in fulfillment of one of his lifelong dreams to have a Gypsy Swing band. His arrangements further enhance this unique, infectious, uplifting and energetic style of music which raised the spirits and helped carry many people in Europe and across the globe through the tumultuous period in history circa the Great Depression and WW2. The music is infectious and the perfect Blend of jazz and folk elements. I’d say Hot Swing is the best way to categorize it, considering before the great French Jazz violinist Stephane Grapelli’s partnership with gypsy virtuoso Django Rheinhart, Eddie Lang and Joe Venutti were pushing this style right here in the USA.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 23 total)
Reply To: Hot Swing (Gypsy Jazz) – Nuages by Django Rheinhart
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