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  • #15073 Reply

    Musicloverk
    Participant

    I find music can trigger strong emotional reactions, both positive and negative. Unfortunately, many of the pieces in traditional instruction books trigger negative reactions for me, I was surprised to find. Looked at a violin shop with a better selection and think I have a plan now!

    #15076 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    That is so interesting. If you’d like to describe your level of playing, I can give you some suggestions on literature. Try to think more analytically, as if the piece is a puzzle you are putting together. Keep your mind focused on the physical tasks of playing, of learning the notes, of creating tones and less about overall melody and harmonic movements that pull at the heart strings. I use the Suzuki Books. I also want to say, I have depression and fully understand how some things can be triggers for negative reactions. I’ve never had that happen to me in music that I’m playing myself, only music I’m passively listening to. I’d be happy to learn more about your experience. Maybe I can help.

    stay positive

    #15100 Reply

    Jinkoid
    Participant

    Dianne Adkins You say to think more analytically while playing, but others advise to let the ‘soul’ come through. How do you reconcile these two seemingly contradictory pieces of advice?

    #15105 Reply

    Musicloverk
    Participant

    Dianne, I appreciate your feedback. I am restarting after over 40 years of not playing violin, but have been back to studying music for 4 1/2 years on piano, which I always wanted to learn also. My violin knowledge has helped me progress very quickly. My teacher says it usually takes students about 10 years to get to where I am. There were many hurts in my life around quitting violin, but the fact that I remembered so much encourages me to try again. I was 1st chair in 2nd violin section in a good school orchestra when I quit. In looking at the Suzuki books, and some others, I probably need something at the 3rd or 4th book level after I refresh my memory on scales. I’ve tried some violins and have more muscle memory than I thought I might. I’m thinking once I get a violin that I should play from piano music that I enjoy for a while to avoid triggering, play some Christian music and maybe try one of the series that includes both fiddle and classical violin. So many of the pieces in the Suzuki books triggered strong reactions when I browsed that it really shocked me. I’m trying to be more gentle with myself this time, to enjoy the process, not push too hard. I found out about some community groups that sound interesting to try. Hope to have finances to rent or buy a violin soon. It was a big hurdle to have the courage to try a few violins and find I could still bow well enough to tell the difference between them, and to look at the instructional books! Maybe I could win the violin giveaway!

    #15158 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    Hi Jinkoid, Fair question. While I didn’t know specifically what kind of emotional reactions Kay was having and to what music, my recommendation to remain analytical was to get her to a calm place mentally so she could do the work required to get the goals of her practice achieved.

    So, if Kay is practicing and gets frustrated, maybe crying, maybe feeling like it’s too hard, I want to get her to a non-emotional state so that she can look at the challenge without it upsetting her and work on it like a math equation or putting puzzle pieces together. If Kay is playing a piece perfectly, so beautifully, that she is moved to tears, she must still hold back to maintain control enough to accomplish the tasks of performance.

    It’s not until the hands know the notes and bowings that the performer will consider emotional content of the music. But often, as spectators, it is believed that an expressive performance is gifted spontaneously with unplanned intensity or sweetness or irony. In reality, each emotion, every body motion, like bowings and fingers drilled hundreds of times, is calculated to tell the story of the music in a personal way. So when you next see a professional performance that moved you, know that the facial expressions, the flying hair, the bending low is all planned carefully to convey the message interpretted it from the written page. Even though you hear the ‘soul’ of the piece in that moment, and see it expressed physically in the performance, it was born within a calm, analytical planning and pre-thought. And it is in that stage of planning that one injects personality, unique to oneself, into the music. By the time of performance and even during the performance, there is very little left to chance or whim.

    #15159 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    Hi Kay, I am sorry the Suzuki Books set off triggers for you, but anything you decide to play, that feels comfortable to you, I am happy to help with any technical questions you might have. Another person who often posts on this forum, Mariko, has submitted videos of pieces that are equal in technical challenges to Suzuki II and IV. Let me suggest them to you, and you can listen on youtube to see if they are something you like. You could also check out Mariko’s video submissions on this forum under Video Submissions thread.

    Here are the pieces: Concertino in G Major Opus 11 by Kuchler, and Concertino in G Major by Komarowski. I believe they each have 3 or 4 movements too. If you do a google search, then look at the images, you might be able to find the sheet music online for free. Good Luck my friend!

    #15198 Reply

    Jinkoid
    Participant

    Dianne Adkins Thank you for the excellent answer, I really appreciate you taking the time to share your position. ^ . ^

    #15200 Reply

    Musicloverk
    Participant

    Dianne, I have used the analytical approach somewhat successfully in my progression with the piano, but do better to find alternate pieces that work on the same skills. Certain music is very depressing or melancholy to me. I have a violin coming to me in a few days. When I studied violin as a child, there was no fun in it or in life most of the time. All hard work, accomplishment, and competition. This time, I want to play music not associated with bad memories as much as possible and enjoy the process. Piano has helped me access some good memories of my violin playing, so I want to build on that. Sometimes I can identify the targeted skill and focus on learning it, then find another piece that I enjoy with that skill. I will work much harder to play well on music I enjoy but not necessarily perfect the whole piece on the others, just work on skill mastery on those. Is this what you meant by the analytical approach?

    #15202 Reply

    Mariko
    Participant

    Hi Dianne, I find your explanation about expressive performances very interesting. I had not thought of it like that before. Only recently I start to understand this a bit as I’m working more on dynamics now. It’s indeed all a process and expressing the emotions with music will take time. I will think of this while practicing my new pieces.

    @Kay, I hope you like those pieces Dianne suggested. They are really great pieces to play! I hope you don’t get negative reactions from those pieces. You might find this page interesting too. It lists many concertos and also mentions for which grade they are and in what position they can be played. Maybe you can find something beautiful that’s good for your level there. Good luck with your violin!

    #15205 Reply

    Mariko
    Participant

    Hi Kay, I was just thinking, maybe you want to check out my channel on YouTube? I’ve uploaded many more videos than those that I posted in the forum here. I don’t want to flood the forum with my videos. 🙂 But the last months I’ve been recording every etude, concerto, fiddle song that I’ve practiced. And maybe there is one that you might like too! I really hope so.

    Also, I read that you “have a plan now”. I’m curious to know what your plan is…

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