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  • #14956 Reply

    dancingviolinist
    Participant

    Does the violin case and cover matter a lot? i only have a simple cushioned case, hardshell, and it does well, but it did not come with the cloth you lay over the instrument before closing it up, as a lot of cases have, and the strings do press the top of the inside of the case when closed. I was just wondering if this is a big deal, and how far you should go exactly with packaging, and temperature control and stuff like that…

    #14957 Reply

    Scott Adams
    Keymaster

    In my experience, the cloth is there as an added layer of protection from things moving around unexpectedly *within* the case. More of a “just in case” (no pun intended) protection. Just because items inside don’t typically touch doesn’t mean they won’t in that rare case something goes awry, or you forget to clip a bow in properly. Am I saying the cloth is a necessity? No. Does it provide peace of mind? Definitely. However, don’t go off buying a new case unless you’re truly concerned about the instrument (ie. noticing explainable marks or shifting of strings/bridge/etc).

    #14978 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    Personally, I never use the cloth covering that comes with the case. It always gets folded up and put somewhere, and forgotten. What I *do* use, instead, is a scarf, which I wrap all around my violin and then place inside the case. I don’t think it would prevent scratches of moving things within my case. But it does prevent dust from getting on my violin and I have always recommended this to students. You can get a cotton bandana for a few dollars that would serve the same purpose.

    What does concern me is that your case presses on the bridge when you close it. This is not good. Make sure you take off the shoulder rest before packing the violin. I would definitely cover the violin, knowing that the top, when closed, is going to press on the strings. This is eventually going to be an issue where either you have trouble keeping the violin tuned, or you’ll open the case and the bridge has fallen.

    How far you should go to protect your violin depends upon how expensive the violin is, and how much you care about it. I would not advise buying a case that is more expensive than the violin, but then again, I would want a case that provides enough room that the violin is not being gradually damaged. You also don’t need a case with humidifier and temp gauge, but these features ARE useful, especially if you want to maintain optimum inner case environment for your violin. You can provide adequate humidity to your instrument with a DAMPIT. Click the image below to view this product and read about the humidity indicator that is included. You can keep the humidity indicator in your case and glance at it to decide when to use the dampit product.

    dampit for violin

    With the current 30% off the price of cases, now is a great time to buy from Superior Violins, especially if you want to have a case that is not crushing your instrument. To me, this just won’t do.

    Have a look at the Kauffman Lightweight Violin Case. Under $80. I had one of these cases in my studio and recently sold it to a student who absolutely loves it. It’s gorgeous. It’s roomy. I had big pockets and a built in humidity indicator. Plus you can keep music stored in the outer pocket. Here’s a pic.

    Kauffman Lightweight Violin Case

    I would recommend that you check out three other cases on Superior Violins while they’re on sale!

    The Superior Wood Shell Violin Case is just over $100 currently. (The sale prices at the time of this post are not currently showing on the product pages, but I have notified them about that.) To see the actual sale prices on all cases, check the All Cases Category Page at Superior Violins.
    Superior Wood Shell Violin Case

    Two more cases are just a little over $100 and are truly beautiful! Well worth the investment. The Carbon Fiber Violin Case (currently available in yellow and orange!) and the beautiful Tourte Violin Case are going for a steal at the moment. I actually have the Tourte violin case in RED and gold and it is simply stunning!

    The Carbon Fiber Violin Case
    Carbon Fiber Violin Case

    The Tourte Violin Case
    Tourte Violin Case

    #15011 Reply

    dancingviolinist
    Participant

    Thank you so much for this information!! I will definitely look into these, Ms. Diane, thanks a LOT!

    #15012 Reply

    dancingviolinist
    Participant

    I do always remove the shoulder rest…

    #15088 Reply

    Esther_Meza
    Participant

    Does having a case in bad shape harm the violin?

    #15126 Reply

    Scott Adams
    Keymaster

    Esther – define what you mean by “bad shape.” Is it aesthetically beat-up, or does it have a hard time staying closed/open, etc?

    #15224 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    Hi Esther! I just wanted to revisit this thread to answer your question a little bit. So the original post described a case that was pressing on the bridge and strings of the violin, which is an indication that the case is a bad fit for the violin, and damaging the violin gradually by crushing down on the bridge. That is why I recommended buying a new case.

    On the other hand, an old beat up case can be fine, but they are usually not well padded. So make sure the violin doesn’t move around within the case when it’s closed. A case should protect the violin from moisture, too. So if there are holes, or not a good seal when closed, I advise a new case. When thinking of a case that is in bad shape, it might have these problems, or it might not stay closed, that’s not good. If you’re case might fly open unexpectedly, time for a new one.

    Cosmetic flaws do not matter. Integrity damages ARE a problem. The case should protect the violin based on your lifestyle, too. If you carry the case around a lot of people, like riding the metro or school bus, where it could get knocked around, I would definitely make sure you had a hardshell case that would protect the violin from impact if dropped or bumped around.

    There is also the bow to consider. It may be hard to believe, but I have seen cases so old and beat up that one of the bow ‘hooks’ was broken, and the bow just dangled from the tip. Bad for the bow and potential to scratch the violin. Also if you have more than one bow, or plan to have more than one, be sure your case provides that feature.

    You might also rather have some extra pockets than an older case provides, so you can store stuff we violinists tend to collect. These newer cases have provided very roomy options for us violinist/ packrats. 🙂

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