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  • #15017 Reply

    Tulsagirl
    Participant

    I have noticed that Jade rosin is mentioned on Violin tutor pro; however, my violin ship does not recommend it. What are the advantages of Jade Rosin versus the traditional rosins? Personally, I prefer Jade Rosin.

    #15033 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    Why do you prefer Jade rosin, just curious? I have never used it before, but I have read that it is more ‘sticky’ than the lighter rosins. If it works for you and you are happy with it, I am not aware of any problems in using it. Personally, I use Leibenzeller rosin, but it’s pretty pricey. I bought two versions of this rosin 30 years ago. I am still using the one I like most. It’s about 1/2 way down. A great deal depends on your bow and violin combination. What the sound potential is from your violin. How well the bow compliments that with your own playing. The strings you’re using. And then, your preference with the rosin. A violinist spends a lifetime tweaking all these things, so be open to trying new products and methods if you just aren’t getting the results you want.

    Jade Brand Violin Rosin
    Jade Brand Violin Rosin

    #15041 Reply

    Tulsagirl
    Participant

    I believe I like the Jade Rosin because of the “sticky” factor and the fact that my violin does not give me the sound production that I would like. Thank you for your reply as it made me think about why I still use the Jade Rosin versus the rosin that my local violin shop recommends. I hop to in the market for a better violin at the end of the summer. My attachment to my instrument is sentimental as my grandfather purchased it for me when I was in high school. My violin was made by a local mechanical engineer friend and co-worker of my father’s. William Rhode violins have a nice sound but little sound production–they are know for that. Unfortunately, my financial status is one of a graduate student working on a PhD which of course means little money. I am saving and hopefully soon will be able to retire my beloved Rhode violin.
    I do believe your assessment of sound production hits the nail on the head as I also use more pressure than I should need to perform. Thank you for your insight!

    Linda

    #15069 Reply

    Scott Adams
    Keymaster

    I use Jade rosin as well. For a long time I used Pirastro Oliv rosin. It’s a dark one that was fairly sticky, which was good for my larger viola. Since picking up an instrument again (different size/type), I’ve used both the basic light rosin, as well as Jade. I do like the Jade a bit better. It still allows for a strong tone, but I’m noticing the hair gliding smoother across the strings that with others. Most likely, your violin shop recommends other rosins based on familiarity and traditional rosin-making techniques. Jade is, in no way, a traditional rosin. Also, from what I understand, Jade has the tendency to gum up strings and the instrument top if it isn’t cleaned regularly and thoroughly. I’ve never had that problem because I take care of my things. 🙂

    #15285 Reply

    RED
    Participant

    Hello my name is Red and I guess everyone has a favorite rosin,mine is Hidersine it’s a dark rosin and it pulls good on the strings and it don’t leave alot of white dust on your violin, not near as hard to clean up.
    Thanks Red

    #15305 Reply

    seth nelson
    Participant

    thanks for the info, helpful

    #15806 Reply

    WonkyViolin
    Participant

    I’ve tried several different types as well. I have Bakers and Jade in my case. Just for fun I will be making my own rosin. Ordered some powdered rosin to make beeswax wraps, so I thought why not!? I’m just going to add a bit of beeswax and some gold leaf to it for fun. Hooray for experiments!

    #15813 Reply

    Scott Adams
    Keymaster

    Thought I’d chime back in again. Since posting back in April I’ve added Magic Rosin to my arsenal. Holy cow, this is great stuff! It has real bite and clarity, but still allows for some rich depth in the sound. I believe Michael has it in his shop at Superior Violins. When you see it, do not write it off as a corny little kids’ rosin. Yes, they do come in a million different “cute” designs, but that’s a marketing tactic and it makes it really fun for beginning students and kids to rosin their bows. This is real and serious rosin. In my humble opinion, between this and Jade, you couldn’t go wrong.

    #15948 Reply

    Andrew Polishchuk
    Participant

    I had some plain rosin which really caused me a lot of problems because it did not hold on to the bow hairs and the sound was not quality. But after hearing Michael’s recommendation of Jade rosin, I decided to give it a try and it surely showed a big difference. It lasts longer, sticks better, and improves the sound. Currently I’m using Jade rosin and am very pleased with it’s performance.

    #15993 Reply

    dew156
    Participant

    If you like the stickiness of the jade rosin, you could try Pirastro Oliv Evah Rosin. Like jade rosin, it is green and sticky. The difference is The Pirastro Oliv Eva is a darker green than the jade to the point where it could be mistaken for black. It is the darkest you will want to go with a violin rosin. It is very sticky because it’s so dark. This is the rosin I use and I love it. Buying rosin is something that you have to mess around with. It’s a personal preference. I like the full rich sound the Pirastro Oliv Eva rosin produces. It’s a little pricey, it costs around $16. But if it sounds like something you would like, go for it.

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