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  • #16243 Reply

    Musicloverk
    Participant

    I’m not sure I understand what is meant by Colle. I watched a video on another site about how to do it, but it just seemed to describe good bowing technique as I remember it. Recently restarting playing after an almost 48 year break, I’m reviewing technique to correct any old problems and prevent developing new bad habits.

    #16257 Reply

    HDuaneaz
    Participant

    Don’t feel lonely. I played 4 years as a child/teenager. Didn’t pick it up until I had an 11 year old daughter that was interested. At that time I took my first private lessons for 5 years. 3 months after I reached my goal of playing my violin teachers orchestra, which now has 60 violins, I got sick. It has been 10 years since that, and I am finally seriously back at it.

    #17610 Reply

    Laurie Trlak
    Participant

    If I remember correctly, collé bowing is a specific technique that involves actually turning the bow over and tapping the wood against the strings. It isn’t used very often.

    #17616 Reply

    Shiroi98
    Participant

    Oh colle bowing is the bending and flexing of the fingers, actually.

    You can view a video of it here

    #17622 Reply

    Suzanne Cox
    Moderator

    Laurie Trlak, the stroke you are referring to is called col legno. You are right in saying it is not used very often. I have only seen it in orchestra music, I have yet to come across it in solo music. It is kind of a fun stroke, and gives a very different sound, but a lot of violinists don’t really like to do it because it is hard on the bow and tends to beat it up a bit. Sometimes when players are using expensive bows they will bring two bows on stage so that they can use the cheaper bow when this stroke comes up in the music.

    Suzanne Cox
    Violin Tutor Pro Teacher

    #17623 Reply

    Scott Adams
    Keymaster

    Good afternoon, all. Thanks for the question, Kay. It’s good to see you active in the forums as well.

    Colle isn’t truly, in itself, a type of bow stroke. In English, “colle” translated to “glue.” It refers to the idea of keeping control of the beginning and end of all bow strokes by focusing in on the fingers on your bow hand – especially in highly-articulated strokes such as martele and slurred staccato.

    #17635 Reply

    Shiroi98
    Participant

    Interesting Scott, when you say “glue”, does that mean gluing the bow direction changes? I’ve seen people use the colle motion when changing bows from up to down or down to up.

    Usually it’s said to bend the fingers more when doing down bow, and flex and straighten / when doing up bows.

    #17636 Reply

    Scott Adams
    Keymaster

    Westley – The name of “colle” or “glue” to this technique refers to using finger control for accented attack at the beginning of precise bow strokes. Developing this fine motor skill can translate into greater control over smoother bow changes as well. Please see my note above about it being associated with martele and slurred staccato. These are specialized bow strokes you’ll have the opportunity to develop as you continue advancing.

    #17699 Reply

    Laurie Trlak
    Participant

    @Suzanne Cox: Yes, your right.I had forgotten.?

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