Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 12 total)
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  • #2404 Reply

    stringdiva010
    Participant

    I am in search for a concise, well-written explanation of all the bowing terms and how to execute them. I have an old Belwin Mills book compiled by Samuel Applebaum entitled “Orchestral Bowing techniques,” but it is no longer in print. I need this for my students. Any suggestions?

    #2516 Reply

    Michael Sanchez
    Keymaster

    I am going to be putting together a nice resource here soon with a video and study. Stay tuned, coming soon!

    #6241 Reply

    malonso5
    Participant

    When playing a long note such as an 8 beat note duration; how can one play the note for 8 beat without being able to hear when the bow is brought back (to continue holding the note)?

    #7517 Reply

    Stradplayer96
    Participant

    My professor calls this a tear drop motion. Up bow, hand moves inward towards your face. Down bow, hand moves outwards from face. The shape you make with your hand becomes a subtle teardrop that keeps the string vibrating at each bow change. The tip will change in angle very subtlety. It will be difficult to learn but that’s the concept I believe you are looking for. Practice with long bowing and gradually shorten the bow usage for each tear drop to make it 2nd nature.

    #7520 Reply

    Stradplayer96
    Participant

    Also when at the tip, in order to make the dynamic consistent, use more first finger pressure on the bow. That is only when you are doing a long down bow, and then on an up bow, gradually decrease the first finger pressure to keep the sound consistent.

    #8391 Reply

    Ariel Polycarpo
    Participant

    I advise you to watch Mr. Sanchez videos. If you want a good book, there’s also one called the art of violin playing by Carl Flesch.

    #9848 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    I am unsure about the whole first finger method. I have always taken a more whole hand, all fingers in balance approach. In fact, Shinichi Suzuki always instructed that to press with the first finger concentrates weight at the lower part of the bow but does little to help with tone at the upper and tip of the bow. He always said never even use the “P” word! He stressed rather, the balance between the strong thumb pushing upwards, fingers on top responding with slight firmness in tandem and generally leaning back on the stick so pinky stays rounded and elbow stays low and relaxed. One exercise often used was to hold the first finger off the bow and play with all the other fingers, to discourage pressure from the first finger and its resultant bad effects. I tell my students to ‘squeeze’ the bow for heaviness at any point in the bow stroke. It doesn’t take much. But all the fingers work together. Pressing and focusing on first finger influences the bow grip to lean in (toward the tip), while ideally fingers should lean back on the stick (toward the frog). When the grip leans in, all sorts of bad things happen and I have seen this many times in my studio and here on the site. Pinkies straighten out and don’t develop back of the hand strength. Elbows raise up above the bow stick which is inefficient. Wrist bends up which is a terrible stress point. Knuckles rise up and carry the bow, instead of laying nice and flat, sort of like a tiger claw. It’s very difficult to hold and use the bow correctly, but if you look at the great players you will see this consistent position of the fingers and overall strength in the back of the hand.

    #9849 Reply

    Dianne Adkins
    Moderator

    In this video, you can see how she explains the back of the hand strength. At one point she even lifts the first finger off the stick. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvolRyfVIZo

    #16014 Reply

    Prog1
    Participant

    Hello Michael,
    Which bow are you using in the Damiano / Kowalski comparison video?

    #16066 Reply

    Prog1
    Participant

    A silver or gold Lugar bow possibly?

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